Burchell’s Famous Sugar Plumbs for Worms

In this latest post, Dr. Iain Macleod looks at one of the more unusual items in our collections. Surgeons’ Hall Museums holds many fascinating objects, but few can be stranger than a collection of nine 18th Century tokens or medals. These were produced by Basil Burchell, (1765-1838), dealer in patent medicines, later a jeweller and…

An Army That Cannot Bite Cannot Fight

In our latest blog, guest author Iain MacLeod takes a look at a British War Office issued dental stoppings (fillings) kit from our collection and tells us why it is so remarkable. Amongst the museum archive collections of the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh is a small wooden box containing the equipment required to…

Medical Miscellany

Guest author Iain Macleod, retired consultant and honorary clinical senior lecturer in dental & maxillofacial radiology, tells us more about an object in our Collection that once belonged to his father. In the early 1950’s my late father, Dr Ian R. Macleod, was conscripted into the army as part of “national service”. As a doctor,…

Putting a Face to the Name: Robert the Bruce

With the release of Netflix’s ‘The Outlaw King’ there has been a piqued interest in Robert the Bruce. In this blog, Dr Iain Macleod, retired consultant and honorary clinical senior lecturer in dental & maxillofacial radiology, tells us about the process of putting a face to this famous name.  On the morning of Friday, 5th November 1819…

Corrosion Casts: Sculpture in the Pathology Gallery

Lindsey started a 20 day internship with the museum as part of her postgraduate degree at Edinburgh University. She is working on an inventory of our pathology gallery which includes over 1000 specimens.

Black Teeth and Tooth Extraction

Dr Paul Geissler, Honourary Curator of the dental collection gives us an insight into 19th Century Japanese dentistry from the museums collections. John Menzies Campbell donated his extensive collection of dental artefacts to the Museum of the Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh in 1966. Among the items he donated is a fascinating and very pleasing…

Unmaking a Murderer

John Baxter writes for Surgeons’ Hall Museums in this guest post chronicling William Burke’s movements in his final 24 hours.  The story of the West Port Murders is one of the most shocking ever recorded in Scottish judicial history.  Over a period of 10 months in 1828, William Burke and William Hare murdered 16 people…

What it’s like working behind the scenes at an anatomy museum

Gillian McDonald writes for iNews in this latest blog post.  Surgeons’ Hall Museums are home to one of the largest and most historic collections of pathology in the world. From the personal collections of renowned anatomists such as Charles Bell, to infamous specimens like the pocketbook made from the skin of murderer William Burke, the…

Skin & Stone: Tattoos & Tombstones with Dig It! 2015

This post originally appeared on Scotland’s Urban Past on 30th October and was written by Sami Binnie. The weather was actually quite lovely when Katie R, Alice and I met up with Julianne and Jeff from Dig It! 2015 in the charming Café 1505 beside the grand Playfair building at Surgeons’ Hall Museums . Here, we discussed…

A Dissection of the New Surgeons’ Hall Museums

We recently invited Cherry Martin, author of The Irregular Anatomist to write a guest article on her experience of the new Surgeons’ Hall Museums. As a frequent visitor and anatomy enthusiast, we were keen to hear what Cherry made of the redevelopments and how her experience compared to previous visits. With a history as dark as…