Pathology Spotlight: Acute pulmonary oedema caused by poison Gas in WWI.

In September’s Pathology Spotlight, the Museums Senior Research Fellow, Ken Donaldson, looks at acute pulmonary oedema caused by poison Gas in WWI. This is a lung taken at post mortem from a British WWI soldier who was gassed with dichlorethyl sulphide, also known as sulphur mustard gas, in France on the 22nd July 1917. His…

Miss Frances Ivens and the Scottish Women’s Hospital in France

Our new exhibition looks at the Scottish Women’s Hospitals (SWH), showcasing The Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh’s Archival collection and the reflections of two local artists, Susie Wilson and Joan Smith. In addition we have been fortunate to receive a loan of materials once belonging to Miss Frances Ivens a leading figure in the…

X-Posed – A glimpse into the injuries of WWI

The museum has recently acquired a series of First World War Glass X-ray plates from Bellahouston Auxiliary Hospital in Glasgow dating from 1918-1919. NHS Fife donated the X-rays after they were discovered in Victoria Hospital, Kirkcaldy in 2014. Bellahouston House in Glasgow was converted into a military hospital during the First World War and operated…